Useful readingSupport & tools
Useful readingSupport & tools
Useful readingSupport & tools
Useful readingSupport & tools
Useful readingSupport & tools
Useful readingSupport & tools
Useful readingSupport & Tools
Useful readingSupport & tools
Useful readingSupport & tools
Useful readingSupport & tools
This is the "Support & tools" page of the "The research process" guide.
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This Libguide provides a systematic guide to the different phases and activities of a master's or doctoral research project and introduces the researcher and research student to relevant Library sources, tools and services offered along the way.
Last Updated: Jun 6, 2017 URL: http://libguides.sun.ac.za/researchprocess Print Guide RSS Updates

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Find & use information: a step by step guide

The Find , access and use information effectively: a step-by-step guide provides a step by step approach to finding and evaluating information resources.  Particularly, step 2 & 3 are relevant in terms of the literature review.

  • Step 2: Find information
    Search strategies | Find books | Find articles | Find websites | Find other sources | Find full-text articles
  • Step 3: Evaluate information
    Evaluate sources | Primary v secondary sources | Types of periodicals

 

Subject guides

Online guides are developed by faculty librarians to provide access to relevant subject information and discipline-related websites.

 

 

Software Tools

Researchers have developed various strategies to deal with the amount of material a literature review generates. The software packages which are most often used as tools support the analysis processes involved in a literature review, are:

  • Atlas.ti
  • N4 Classic
  • N5
  • NVIVO
  • WinMax

Source: Di Gregorio, S. 2000. Using NVIVO for your literature review. Paper presented at Strategies in Qualitative Research: issues and results form analyses using QSR NVIVO and NUD*IST, Conference at the Institute of Education, London - 29-30 September 2000

 

 

Online tutorial

This Youtube video "3 ways to structure your Literature Review.mp4" outlines three of the best ways to structure your literature review, no matter what the subject. More information is available on the author's blog at http://www.literaturereviewhq.com/.

 

Library training opportunities

The Library offers workshops throughout the year to assist you in getting the most from the University’s wide array of information resources and discovery tools.  The training sessions listed below are specifically aimed at enabling you to find relevant sources for your literature review.

  • Find books or articles using SUNSearch (Library search engine)
  • Improving your literature search strategy
  • Finding full-text easily
  • Are you using Google / Google Scholar optimally?
  • Creating alerts to stay up to date in your discipline

Use the Library's training calendar to register for a session or for more information.

 

Alert services

  • Quarterly workshops are presented by the Library with regard to setting up alerts for various academic databases as well as Google and Google Scholar. Use the Library's training calendar to register for a session or for more information.
  • Consult your faculty librarian to assist you with setting up alerts in appropriate databases / journals.
 

Atlas.ti Centre

The African Institute for ATLAS.ti (AIA) is a collaborative project between the ATLAS.ti and the ADA, which was initiated by Ms Lauren Wildschut, the ADA’s ATLAS.ti trainer. The main objective of the AIA will be to provides ATLAS.ti training and support for doctoral students using ATLAS.ti for literature reviews.

Fltr: Ms Lauren Wildschut (ADA), Dr Susanne Friese (ATLAS.ti Institute in Berlin) and Prof Johann Mouton (ADA).

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